About "The North"

The people, places, events and latest research of Canada’s subarctic and Arctic regions, one of the fastest-changing environments on Earth

Best Canadian Geographic maps 2019
Cartographic highlights from Canadian Geographic’s 2019 issues
Fishing boat on the shore of Spitsbergen, Svalbard

Relics from past eras, such as this fishing boat on the shore of Spitsbergen, are common reminders of Svalbard's long history. (Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Tanya Kirnishni
From coal mining to scientific research, the remote archipelago of Svalbard has a rich and complex heritage
ice chunks near glacier

Ice breaking off at the Burgerbukta Glacier, which extends out into the Hornsund fiord in southern Svalbard. (Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Can Geo)

Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Can Geo
A warmer, wetter, and wilder climate is unbalancing the Arctic ecosystem
Researchers from the international PoLAR-FIT team are revealing a four-million-year-old forest beautifully preserved in permafrost and peat on Nunavut’s Ellesmere Island

The main expedition campsite of the PoLAR-FIT research team, just southwest of the Fyles Leaf Beds fossil site on Ellesmere Island. (Photo: Alexandra Rouillard)

Photo: Alexandra Rouillard
Researchers from the international PoLAR-FIT team are revealing a four-million-year-old forest beautifully preserved in permafrost and peat on Nunavut’s Ellesmere Island
Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North

Kenn Harper’s new book (left) details traditional Inuit mythology such as the central story of Sedna (right) and how those beliefs came to interact with Christianity, which missionaries began introducing into the Arctic in the 19th century. (Left: Courtesy of Inhabit Media; right: Germaine Arnaktauyok: Sedna — The Ruler, 1994/courtesy of Inhabit Media)

Left: Courtesy of Inhabit Media; right: Germaine Arnaktauyok: Sedna — The Ruler, 1994/courtesy of Inhabit Media
In this exclusive excerpt from Kenn Harper’s new book, the Arctic historian explores tales of Inuit and Christian beliefs and how these came to coexist — and sometimes clash — in the 19th and 20th centuries
Adam Shoalts paddles across Great Bear Lake

Royal Canadian Geographical Society Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts paddles through an ice-strewn Great Bear Lake, N.W.T., during his 2017 Trans-Canada Arctic Expedition. (Photo: Adam Shoalts)

Adam Shoalts paddles across Great Bear Lake
An exclusive excerpt from the new book Beyond the Trees: A Journey Alone Across Canada's Arctic by Royal Canadian Geographical Society Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts
Two female adventurers prepare to overwinter in Svalbard

Sunniva Sorby, right and Hilde Fålun Strøm thank their friends and supporters as they prepare to disembark the ship MS Nordstjernen and begin their nine-month stay at Bamsebu in Svalbard. (Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Canadian Geographic
Sunniva Sorby and Hilde Fålun Strøm share details of their “Hearts in the Ice” project and why they want to inject hope into the conversation about climate change 
A research ship off the coast of Baffin Island, Nunavut

This year, the expedition members were ferried to the beach on Baffin Island aboard the Nunavut research vessel, RV Nuliajuak. (Photo: Alex Taylor and Robert Kautuk)

Photo: Alex Taylor and Robert Kautuk
Mike Moloney and Matthew Ayre continued their hunt for the Nova Zembla this summer, and the findings of their Royal Canadian Geographical Society-funded expedition are remarkable

From left) Chris Giard, Alex Traynor, Noah Booth and David Greene pose with the RCGS expedition flag in front of Mistastin Falls, Labrador. (Photo: Alex Traynor/Northern Scavenger)

Photo: Alex Traynor/Northern Scavenger
The Boreal to Barrenlands Expedition, funded by The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, returns from their summer slog through northern Quebec and Labrador 
Mark Napier (left) and Lanny McDonald play hockey on the Arctic Ocean with youth from Arctic Bay. (Photo: Michelle Valberg)

Mark Napier (left) and Lanny McDonald play hockey on the Arctic Ocean with youth from Arctic Bay. (Photo: Michelle Valberg)

Photo: Michelle Valberg
Photographer Michelle Valberg discusses Project North, her not-for-profit that delivers hockey equipment to communities in Nunavut, Northwest Territories, northern Quebec and Labrador
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