Places

Back where they belong

Nearly wiped out in Alberta in the 1800s, plains bison are making a historic return to Banff National Park 
  • Jan 13, 2018
  • 54 words
  • 1 minutes
Plains bison with their calves in banff national park Expand Image
Advertisement

Spring in the remote Panther River valley in Alberta’s Banff National Park sounds almost exactly like you imagine it should. The air explodes with birdsong. The river, finally free of ice, roars along its course. Fat bumblebees hum by like tiny zeppelins, occasionally colliding with scorpionweed blossoms. A cool wind rustles the trees.

Plains bison grazing in Banff National Park
Caring for bison is no easy feat. Here, Karsten Heuer and Geoff Skinner pose with "The Honeywagon," which they use to collect the animals' feces to help prevent the spread of parasites. Bison are prolific poopers, so the task can take hours. (Photo: Niki Wilson)
Expand Image
Caring for bison is no easy feat. Here, Karsten Heuer and Geoff Skinner pose with "The Honeywagon," which they use to collect the animals' feces to help prevent the spread of parasites. Bison are prolific poopers, so the task can take hours. (Photo: Niki Wilson)
Expand Image
Karsten Heuer Geoff Skinner with Honeywagon
Caring for bison is no easy feat. Here, Karsten Heuer and Geoff Skinner pose with "The Honeywagon," which they use to collect the animals' feces to help prevent the spread of parasites. Bison are prolific poopers, so the task can take hours. (Photo: Niki Wilson)
Expand Image
Caring for bison is no easy feat. Here, Karsten Heuer and Geoff Skinner pose with "The Honeywagon," which they use to collect the animals' feces to help prevent the spread of parasites. Bison are prolific poopers, so the task can take hours. (Photo: Niki Wilson)
Expand Image
Advertisement

Related Content

A crowd of tourist swarm on a lakeside beach in Banff National Park

Places

Smother Nature: The struggle to protect Banff National Park

In Banff National Park, Alberta, as in protected areas across the country, managers find it difficult to balance the desire of people to experience wilderness with an imperative to conserve it

  • 3507 words
  • 15 minutes
Andy McKinnon

Places

Canada’s first national urban park

It’s an ambitious plan: take the traditional Parks Canada wilderness concept and plunk it in the country’s largest city. But can Toronto’s Rouge National Urban Park help balance city life with wildlife?

  • 3601 words
  • 15 minutes
Parks Canada red Muskoka chairs on a snowy slope overlooking the Banff townsite

Places

Parks Canada to take ‘nature first’ approach to managing national parks

Responding to feedback from Canadians, environment minister Catherine McKenna promised a renewed focus on science and conservation for Canada's protected places

  • 754 words
  • 4 minutes
How national parks are helping to conserve species

Places

Five projects that are helping to conserve endangered species in Canada’s national parks

From plains bison in Elk Island National Park to beluga whales in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, Parks Canada is leading the charge on these crucial wildlife recovery programs 

  • 1174 words
  • 5 minutes