Travel

Time and the war

Roaming First World War sites and cemeteries in northern France and Belgium, Stephen Smith reflects on what time heals — and what it can’t 
  • Nov 15, 2018
  • 35 words
  • 1 minutes
St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and t Expand Image
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War debris, unearthed from the soil of France and displayed in the Musée Jean et Denise Letaille in Bullecourt, France. (Photo: Stephen Smith)
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War debris First World War
War debris, unearthed from the soil of France and displayed in the Musée Jean et Denise Letaille in Bullecourt, France. (Photo: Stephen Smith)
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War debris, unearthed from the soil of France and displayed in the Musée Jean et Denise Letaille in Bullecourt, France. (Photo: Stephen Smith)
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