This article is over 5 years old and may contain outdated information.

This article is over 5 years old and may contain outdated information.

People & Culture

Ancient spine-headed marine worm fossil identified in Burgess Shale

Capinatator praetermissus was much larger than modern species and used its many spines to grab prey
  • Aug 15, 2017
  • 7 words
  • 1 minutes
Illustration detail of Capinatator praetermissus Expand Image
Expand Image

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