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Ancient spine-headed marine worm fossil identified in Burgess Shale

Capinatator praetermissus was much larger than modern species and used its many spines to grab prey
  • Aug 15, 2017
  • 7 words
  • 1 minutes
Illustration detail of Capinatator praetermissus Expand Image
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