About "Wildlife"

From polar bears to peregrine falcons, blue whales to bees, find out about Canada’s wildlife, habitats and conservation news.

Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon.

Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon. This image is part of a series, “Amazon: Paradise Threatened,” by American photographer Daniel Beltra exploring the destruction of the world’s largest tropical rainforest. Beltra placed third in the Environment - Stories category of the 2018 World Press Photo Contest. (Photo: Daniel Beltra)

Photo: Daniel Beltra
Tour of winning images to make four Canadian stops, starting July 20 at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
Little brown bat

Little brown bats in eastern Canada have been hit hard by white-nose syndrome and are now considered endangered. The disease is spreading west, leaving biologists scrambling for solutions. (Photo: Cori Lausen)

Photo: Cori Lausen
Disease has appeared for the first time in Manitoba, Minnesota and Wyoming 
The marsh boardwalk through Point Pelee National Park at sunset

Point Pelee National Park is a birder’s dream, a paddler’s paradise, and the perfect place to get up close and personal with nature. (Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic
Established in 1918, Canada’s southernmost national park is a haven for wildlife and nature lovers alike
a great blue heron skims across the water, with Roberts Bank port in the background;

A great blue heron skims across the water, with Vancouver’s Roberts Bank port in the background. (Photo: Ben Nelms/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ben Nelms/Canadian Geographic
A booming economy, a thriving community, a healthy environment — can Vancouver have it all?
Tombstones representing each of Canada's 51 endangered caribou herds set up outside the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Canada in Gatineau, Que. May 1st, 2018

Greenpeace activists erected 51 tombstones (representing the 51 caribou herds in Canada) outside the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Canada on May 1 to denounce Canada’s failure to protect endangered caribou. (Photo: Toma Iczkovits/Greenpeace)

Photo: Toma Iczkovits/Greenpeace
The federal government has committed $1.26 million over five years for First Nations-led projects to preserve the endangered herd 
Polar bear and cub on green tundra

An aerial survey of southern Hudson Bay has found that the previously stable polar bear population is now in decline, with fewer cubs surviving their first year. (Photo: Martyn Obbard)

Photo: Martyn Obbard
The number of polar bears living around southern Hudson Bay has dropped by nearly a fifth since 2011
Image of a polar bear, and the cover of "The Subjugation of Canadian wildlife"

In “The Subjugation of Canadian Wildlife,” Max Foran explores the ways Canadian governments and society have failed to protect our country’s wildlife. (Photo: Joe Desjardins/Can Geo Photo Club; cover image courtesy McGill-Queen’s University Press)

Photo: Joe Desjardins/Can Geo Photo Club; cover image courtesy McGill-Queen’s University Press
In a new book, Max Foran denounces Canada's failures in protecting its wildlife from human exploitation
This stunning view from King Creek Ridge, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, tells a story of how fire has changed the mountain landscape. Photo: Mountain Legacy Project.

This stunning view from King Creek Ridge, Kananaskis Country, Alta., tells a story of how fire has changed the mountain landscape. (Photo: Mountain Legacy Project)

Photo: Mountain Legacy Project
A new report by Alpine Club of Canada scientists and other experts highlights worrying trends in Canada’s mountain ecosystems
Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic
Canadian Geographic will collaborate with McKenna on exclusive content for the November/December 2018 issue 
A Canada jay in flight with outstretched wings in southwestern B.C.

What’s in a name? Fans of the erstwhile grey jay have long wanted the bird’s name to once again reflect its connection to the north. (Photo: Ian Harland/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Ian Harland/Can Geo Photo Club
For decades, the gregarious bird of the northern forest was simply called the “grey jay.” Now, ornithologists are once again embracing the jay’s nationality. 
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