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Inspiration for exploring Canadian places and cultures and other favourite destinations through spectacular storytelling and photography, insider travel tips and service information, news and reviews.

George Kourounis inside the Marum crater of Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu

George Kourounis stands beside a lava lake inside the Marum crater on Ambrym, a volcanic island in the Vanuatu archipelago, in 2014. To get to the lake, Kourounis and his film crew had to rappel down the side of the crater, which is deeper than the Empire State Building is tall. (Photo courtesy George Kourounis)

Photo courtesy George Kourounis
Whether outrunning a tornado, dodging lava bombs or hunkering down in a hurricane, explorer George Kourounis is most comfortable living on the edge
Tanya Talaga illustration by Mary McPherson

Illustration: Mary McPherson/Canadian Geographic

Illustration: Mary McPherson/Canadian Geographic
The award-winning author and journalist on her connections to the shores of Lake Superior at the Fort William First Nation, Ont.

Sunlight breaks through dark clouds to cast a glow over the Tombstone River Valley near the Talus Lake backcountry campground in Yukon’s Tombstone Territorial Park. (Photo: Victor Liu)

Photo: Victor Liu
A look back at the most awe-inspiring and thought-provoking visuals we published this year
Skeena Heliskiing chopper

A Skeena Heliskiing chopper circles over the Skeena Mountain Range of northern British Columbia.

Photo: Bruce Kirkby
10,000 square kilometres of remote mountain wilderness, routine white-out conditions, avalanche-prone slopes, and just five guides: Welcome to the Skeena heli-skiing tenure
Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Photo courtesy Senate of Canada
Inside the transformation of the old Ottawa train station into the “Red Chamber on Rideau”
A display of northern lights over the northwest passage

A display of northern lights over the Northwest Passage in the Canadian High Arctic. (Photo: Scott Forsyth/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Scott Forsyth/Can Geo Photo Club
In the stillness of an Arctic midwinter night, an old church bell rang out, and I stopped breathing for a few seconds
A tribute placed at the Vimy Memorial

A remembrance tribute placed at the foot of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France ahead of this month’s centennial commemorations of the Armistice that ended the First World War. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith/Canadian Geographic
Now that a century has passed since the end of the First World War, is it inevitable that efforts to remember the events of the war will start to fade?
St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and t

St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and two Canadians. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith
Roaming First World War sites and cemeteries in northern France and Belgium, Stephen Smith reflects on what time heals — and what it can’t 
Canadian National Vimy Memorial monument with sheep grazing

A placid view of the fields outlying Walter Allward’s magnificent Vimy Memorial, but this, too, is true: this land and much more here is fenced off from human tread, due to the lingering dangers of undetonated explosives. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith
There are many ways to honour those who served and died in global conflicts, such as going to memorials — but perhaps it’s best to spend time there alone
Vimy centennial park aerial view vimy national historic site

Situated adjacent to the Canadian National Vimy Memorial, the Vimy Foundation Centennial Park is intended to be a space for reflection and discussion on the legacy of the decisive First World War battle. (Photo: Pascal Brunet/Vimy Foundation)

Photo: Pascal Brunet/Vimy Foundation
The Vimy Foundation Centennial Park provides a home for 100 repatriated ‘Vimy Oaks’ and is intended to be a space for reflection on the decisive battle
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