About "History"

From Canada’s early First Nations and Inuit cultures to European exploration, Confederation, women’s suffrage, wartime and beyond.

Peel River Expedition 2019 aerial view of Wind River

An aerial view of the Wind River, the headwaters of the Peel River watershed in the Yukon. (Photo: David McGuffin)

Peel River Expedition 2019 aerial view of Wind River
David McGuffin shares insights from his daily log during his summer 2018 expedition retracing a legendary trek on the Yukon’s Peel River
Vinessa Antoine as Marcie Diggs in CBC's new television show Diggstown

Vinessa Antoine plays Marcie Diggs in CBC's new television show Diggstown, set in Nova Scotia. (Photo: CBC)

Photo: CBC
The star of CBC’s Diggstown discovers Nova Scotia’s black history
The Flag Committee, Canada, Flag, maple leaf, 1965

The Flag Committee (left) began its deliberations with a sense of historical mission and in a spirit of cooperation. It wouldn’t last. Nevertheless, on Feb. 15, 1965, Canada had a new national flag to raise (right) at a celebration in front of Parliament’s Centre Block. (Left: Queen’s University Archives, John Matheson Fonds, Locator #2131; right: Duncan Cameron/Duncan Cameron/PA-168019, Library and Archives Canada)

Left: Queen’s University Archives, John Matheson Fonds, Locator #2131; right: Duncan Cameron/Duncan Cameron/PA-168019, Library and Archives Canada
Our beloved red-and-white maple leaf flag was raised on Feb. 15, 1965, but not before years of angry debates and a parade of competing designs were put down
The Tuglavina family at Okak, 1915, right to left: Arnatuk, Renatus (Kuttaktok), Josef and Jonas

Renatus Tuglavina, second from right, with his mother Arnatuk and younger brothers Josef and Jonas at Okak, Labrador, 1915. Years later, in Hebron, Renatus would orchestrate a series of break-ins at the HBC store to raise awareness of the unfair treatment of the local Inuit at the hands of the HBC. (Photo: Dr. S.K. Hutton. Memorial University of Newfoundland Archives and Special Collections)

Photo: Dr. S.K. Hutton, 1915.
The amazing story of Renatus Tuglavina, remembered in northern Labrador as a folk hero
teachers caring for students sick with the Spanish Flu

Des enseignantes s’occupent d’enfants malades de la grippe espagnole au collège La Salle de Thetford Mines, au Québec. (Photo : Centre d’archives de la région de Thetford - Fonds Galerie de nos ancêtres de l’or blanc, Donateur : Juliette Dallaire)

Photo : Centre d’archives de la région de Thetford - Fonds Galerie de nos ancêtres de l’or blanc (Donateur: Juliette Dallaire)
L’histoire méconnue de la grippe espagnole de 1918 et notre état de préparation à la prochaine grande pandémie
Josiah Henson, log cabin, Ontario, historic site

The Henson House has been moved many times since Josiah Henson’s death in 1883, but its current location by the Sydenham River on Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site is similar to its original setting. (Photo: Heather Greenwood Davis)

Photo: Heather Greenwood Davis
Heather Greenwood Davis visits Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site in Dresden, Ont., to learn more about the contentious inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Map of Segezha, northwestern Russia

A map used to plan a surprise attack led by Canadians on Segezha, a village in northwestern Russia in February 1919. (Map credit: Proposed Operation at Segezha by Major Drake-Brockman, 1919-1920, John Edwards Leckie fonds, Library and Archives Canada, e011202552)

How Canadians went from fighting Germans in Europe to battling Bolsheviks in Russia after the First World War
Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Photo courtesy Senate of Canada
Inside the transformation of the old Ottawa train station into the “Red Chamber on Rideau”
Hebron Mission Station 1906 with Harmony ship in background

A view of Hebron mission station in 1906 with the supply ship Harmony (No. 5) visible in the bay. The Harmony brought Spanish influenza to Labrador in 1918. (Photo: Hebron, Bucht mit Eisschollen und Harmony 1906 by Bohlmann, Ernst, 1864-1945. Archives and Special Collections, Memorial University of Newfoundland)

Archives and Special Collections, Memorial University of Newfoundland
An excerpt from We All Expected to Die: Spanish Influenza in Labrador, 1918-1919
A tribute placed at the Vimy Memorial

A remembrance tribute placed at the foot of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France ahead of this month’s centennial commemorations of the Armistice that ended the First World War. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith/Canadian Geographic
Now that a century has passed since the end of the First World War, is it inevitable that efforts to remember the events of the war will start to fade?
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