About "Exploration"

Follow Canada’s greatest explorers and adventurers as they travel to the remote corners of the country, deep beneath the Earth’s surface and across oceans, to the tops of mountains and into space.

Aurora borealis light up the night over Waterbury Lake in northern Saskatchewan

Aurora borealis light up the night over Waterbury Lake in northern Saskatchewan. The much-mythologized phenomenon is the only visual evidence we have of the powerful force that helped create our modern world — and could easily bring it down. (Photo: Ezra Meszaros/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Ezra Meszaros/Can Geo Photo Club
In this exclusive excerpt from her new book 'The Spinning Magnet,' Alanna Mitchell explains why we should know and care about Earth's electromagnetic field 
Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre on a previous expedition in Alaska

Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre pictured on a previous expedition in Alaska. The duo hoped to become the first team to summit Canada's third-highest mountain in the winter, but have been forced to aim for a different peak due to weather and terrain conditions. (Photo courtesy Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre)

Photo courtesy Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre
Crevasses and the landing location near Mount Lucania force Lonnie Dupre and Pascale Marceau to set their sights on Mount Steele, Canada’s fifth-highest peak
"sump" in Bisaro Anima

A "sump" — an underground channel filled to the roof with water — discovered in the Bisaro Anima cave during a previous expedition in October 2017. On January 1, 2018, caver Kathleen Graham was able to explore the sump in scuba gear and confirm Bisaro Anima as the deepest cave in Canada. (Photo: Jared Habiak/Bisaro Plateau Caves Project)

Photo: Jared Habiak/Bisaro Plateau Caves Project
At 670 metres, Bisaro Anima near Fernie, B.C. is confirmed to be Canada's deepest cave
science, arctic, whale

The dorsal fin of an adult humpback whale is satellite tagged to transmit the whale’s position and behaviour for approximately one month, part of Ari Friedlander's research supported by One Ocean Expeditions. (Photo: One Ocean Expeditions)

Photo: One Ocean Expeditions
Andrew Prossin, managing director of the Canadian expedition cruise operator, discusses polar science, the Victoria Strait Expedition and more 
Left: The cover of Joanna Kafarowski's new book on Louise Arner Boyd, "The Polar Adventures of a Rich American Dame." Right: Boyd on board the ship Hobby in 1928.

Left: The cover of Joanna Kafarowski's new book on Louise Arner Boyd, "The Polar Adventures of a Rich American Dame." (Image courtesy Dundurn Press) Right: Boyd onboard the Hobby during the 1928 mission to rescue Roald Amundsen. (Photo: Norsk Polarinstitutt [NPO18311])

Images courtesy Dundurn Press, Norsk Polarinstitutt
After inheriting her family's staggering fortune, Louise Arner Boyd organized, financed and directed seven expeditions to the Arctic — yet her contributions to polar science remain virtually unknown

George Dawson's map of the canoe journey he made from Lake of the Woods, Ont., to Dufferin, Man., in 1873. (Map credit: Sketch Map showing Indian Canoe route explored by Mr. G.M. Dawson Geologist H.M.N.A.B.C., 1873, G.M. Dawson, Library and Archives Canada, e011161386-v8)

How George Dawson’s seminal work for the British North American Boundary Commission did far more than simply mark the 49th parallel

Homeward Bound's inaugural voyage in 2016 aboard the MV Ushuaia. (Photo: Deborah Pardo)

Photo: Deborah Pardo
Dr. Catherine Sorbara is the sole Canadian participating in Homeward Bound 2018, an annual three-week-long expedition in Antarctica aimed at bolstering women leaders in STEMM
The Nokedjak from Squaxin Island in Stz’uminus waters on the 2017 Tribal Canoe Journey.

The Nokedjak from Squaxin Island in Stz’uminus waters on the 2017 Tribal Canoe Journey. (Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat)

Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat
Images from an annual odyssey to reclaim tradition and territory in the Pacific Northwest
Cover of New Views by Alastair Bonnett

In New Views: The World Mapped Like Never Before (inset), social geographer Alastair Bonnett delivers on the title's promise: new ways of seeing our world, like this map of undersea cables. (Images courtesy Aurum Press)

Images courtesy Aurum Press
In his new book, social geographer Alastair Bonnett promises 50 maps unlike any you've ever seen. Here's a look at six of our favourites.
Portion of Paolo Forlani's 1560 map of the world showing "Canada" for the first time

Can you see Canada? This 1560 map of the world by Italian engraver Paolo Forlani is the first known instance of the name "Canada" appearing on a printed map. (Map: Paolo Forlani, Paulus de Furlanis Veronensis opus hoc ex.mi cosmographi d[omi]ni Iacobi Gastaldi pedemontani instauravit, et dicavit ex.ti iur. vt doct[iss] et aurato aequiti d[omi]no Paulo Michaeli Vincentino, 1560, Library and Archives Canada e006581135)

Map: Paolo Forlani, courtesy Library and Archives Canada
In 1560, Italian map engraver Paolo Forlani became the first to include "Canada" on a printed map
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