About "Exploration"

Follow Canada’s greatest explorers and adventurers as they travel to the remote corners of the country, deep beneath the Earth’s surface and across oceans, to the tops of mountains and into space.

Henry Larsen
Part of our roundup of Canada’s greatest explorers, these nine explorers made significant crossings of land and water, often in daring or ingenious fashion
Matt Maddaloni, David Steele, and Adam Walker at the Dieppe Sump with the RCGS flag (Robin Munshaw/Pegleg Films)

Left to right: Matt Maddaloni, David Steele, and Adam Walker with the RCGS flag at the Dieppe Sump, the deepest known point of Bisaro Anima cave. (Photo: Robin Munshaw/Pegleg Films)

Photo: Robin Munshaw/Pegleg Films
Resilience pays off during a challenging effort to explore new leads in Canada’s deepest cave
Samuel de Champlain
Part of our roundup of 90 of Canada’s greatest explorers, these 16 explorers significantly advanced our knowledge of Canada’s geography through mapping
Roberta Bondar on space shuttle discovery

Roberta Bondar inspired a new generation of explorers, who are able to communicate about our natural world through science and fine arts. (Photo: Roberta Bondar)

Photo: Roberta Bondar
Part of our roundup of 90 of Canada’s greatest explorers, these 17 explorers made major contributions to our understanding of Canada’s history and geography
Man on cliff with mountain view.

Photo: Baffin Paddle & Climb 2019

Photo: Baffin Paddle & Climb 2019
On its 90th anniversary, Canadian Geographic presents the 90 most influential explorers in the nation’s recorded history
Charles Camsell Christmas

A photo from the Liard River Canyon during the expedition that inspired Royal Canadian Geographical Society founder Charles Camsell (second from left) to write a Christmas story that has since been shared with his family for generations. (Photo courtesy of David McGuffin)

(Photo courtesy of David McGuffin)
Nearly 100 years ago, Royal Canadian Geographical Society founder Charles Camsell wrote a Christmas story that has been shared through his family for generations. In honour of the Society’s 90th anniversary, his family shared it with Canadian Geographic to be published for the first time. 
A woman paddles a stand up paddleboard in the water

Sheri Bastien paddles off Hoddevika on the west coast of Norway. (Photo courtesy Sheri Bastien)

Photo courtesy Sheri Bastien
Canadian scientist Sheri Bastien discusses her involvement in eXXpedition, an all-female expedition to study ocean plastic
Overhead view of Jawdrop base camp with Claire and Eva watching Robin rig the cave entrance

In August, a team of cavers set up camp on this karst plateau in West Kootenay, B.C. to investigate a series of cave entrances, the largest of which they called Jawdrop, pictured. (Photo: Douglas Noblet)

Photo: Douglas Noblet
A Royal Canadian Geographical Society-supported expedition has added to the inventory of known caves in a little-explored region
Mario Rigby

Explorer Mario Rigby at the headquarters of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and Canadian Geographic in Ottawa during his 2019 cross-Canada cycling expedition. (Photo: Javier Frutos/Can Geo)

Photo: Javier Frutos/Can Geo
Having recently completed a 7,000-kilometre cycling expedition, Rigby shares insights on diversity in the outdoors and what he hopes to do next
Adam Shoalts paddles across Great Bear Lake

Royal Canadian Geographical Society Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts paddles through an ice-strewn Great Bear Lake, N.W.T., during his 2017 Trans-Canada Arctic Expedition. (Photo: Adam Shoalts)

Adam Shoalts paddles across Great Bear Lake
An exclusive excerpt from the new book Beyond the Trees: A Journey Alone Across Canada's Arctic by Royal Canadian Geographical Society Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts
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