Science & Tech

UN declares International Day of Women in Science

From Roberta Bondar to Harriet Brooks, Canada has more than its fair share of women scientists to be proud of. However women are still a minority in the STEM fields
  • Feb 10, 2016
  • 472 words
  • 2 minutes
Map showing the proportion of women researchers around the world. (Map: Empower_Women/Twitter)
Expand Image

From Roberta Bondar to Harriet Brooks, Canada has more than its fair share of women scientists to be proud of. However women are still a minority in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (commonly referred to as STEM).

Women make up only 28 per cent of researchers around the world, with the gap becoming more prominent at senior management positions, according to the most recent UNESCO Science Report.

In response, the United Nations has declared Feb. 11, 2016 as the inaugural International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

“More than ever today, the world needs science and science needs women,“ says Ms. Irina Bokova, director-general of UNESCO, in a press release.

Following the announcement, scores of Canadian scientists, politicians, and national institutions took to twitter to celebrate the day and spread resources. A selection of those reactions are below.

Related Content

Shelley Ball with a chinstrap penguin in Antarctica

Science & Tech

How the Homeward Bound expedition program is empowering women in science

As a biologist and photographer, I had long hoped to visit Antarctica — but this journey was much more than a travel dream fulfilled

  • 1126 words
  • 5 minutes

People & Culture

Recognizing Women’s Dive Day in 2020

  • 1018 words
  • 5 minutes
Courage and Passion: Canadian Women in the Natural Sciences

Science & Tech

Celebrating Canadian women trailblazers in science

Courage and Passion: Canadian Women in the Natural Sciences aims to inspire young women to pursue careers in science

  • 933 words
  • 4 minutes

Science & Tech

Canadian wins international For Women in Science award

Biomedical engineering professor Molly Shoichet has been named this year’s L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science North American laureate

  • 611 words
  • 3 minutes