Wildlife

Infographic: Cicadas to emerge after 17 years underground

After spending the past 17 years underground, a brood of cicadas will soon emerge en masse in the northeastern United States.
  • May 03, 2016
  • 113 words
  • 1 minutes
Infographic: Alissa Dicaire
Infographic: Alissa Dicaire
Expand Image

This spring might be rough for people who don’t like insects. The cicadas are coming.

After spending the past 17 years underground, a brood of cicadas will soon emerge en masse in the northeastern United States. Their last appearance was in 1999.

Periodical cicadas (annual cicadas emerge every year) are grouped into broods based on the year they emerge. This particular brood, Brood V, will appear in parts of Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

They’ll be around for four to six weeks until the adults die and the offspring hide away into the ground for another 17 years.

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