This article is over 5 years old and may contain outdated information.

People & Culture

Giving artisans access

How Artisan Hub is helping connect traditional craftspeople in developing countries to new and potentially lucrative foreign markets

  • Dec 22, 2017
  • 68 words
  • 1 minutes
A woman weaves Jamdani fabric in Bangladesh. The fabric, which UNESCO has recognized as an item that represents the intangible cultural heritage of humanity, is one of many handicrafts on the Artisan Hub website Expand Image
Advertisement

Traditional artisans in countries such as Bangladesh don’t often have access to lucrative foreign markets. A Canadian venture called Artisan Hub is working to change that. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

Visit the Charting Change website to read “Giving artisans access.”

Advertisement

Are you passionate about Canadian geography?

You can support Canadian Geographic in 3 ways:

Related Content

People & Culture

Trans Canada Trail and AccessNow unite: New partnership creates greater accessibility

Canadian Paralympians and Para athletes join the mission to increase trail accessibility across Canada

  • 856 words
  • 4 minutes

Environment

Thinking about Thanksgiving: How the Live Net Zero families modified their holiday habits

From cutting back on travel to preparing vegetarian meals, the Live Net Zero families made a concerted effort to reduce the environmental footprint of their Thanksgiving celebrations

  • 1060 words
  • 5 minutes
Oven roasted turkey, part of the typical modern-day meal at Thanksgiving

History

Canadian thanksgiving in November

How giving thanks was once linked to Armistice Day

  • 250 words
  • 1 minutes

Mapping

Mapping project aims to make Canada’s trails more accessible

Phase One of Trans Canada Trail accessibility mapping project complete thanks to para athletic power

  • 861 words
  • 4 minutes