History

Throwback Thursday: 1930's electricity advertisement

Social media editor Carys Mills looks back at an electricity advertisement from the 1930s
  • Mar 25, 2015
  • 101 words
  • 1 minutes
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Back in 1931, “modern gifts” included fancy irons, percolators, toasters and waffle irons.

Not only were the appliances modern, they were “electrical servants,” says a Canadian General Electric advertisement that ran in the June 1931 issue of Canadian Geographical Journal.

“Most welcome of all gifts is the General Electric Hotpoint Range . . . the range that was ‘designed by women for women'” reads part of the ad, which also says “these are the gifts that will give lasting service and pleasure.”

More than 80 years later, I don’t think we’ll see modern Canadian electronics marketed as “electric servants” again.

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