Wildlife

Photos: Wolverine life

He refers to them as ‘snow machines.’ Photographer Peter Mather has photographed wolverines in the Yukon and on Alaska’s North Slope

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A healthy wolverine population is a strong indicator of a healthy ecosystem, since wolverines need lots of types of food and lots of space to roam.

Today, the biggest threat to wolverines is habitat loss and human development. Researchers are working with Indigenous communities across the North to track and monitor wolverine populations to better understand how their habitats are being affected by human encroachment. 

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