Science & Tech

Throwback Thursday: International Polar Year

Five years have passed since the International Polar Year. Brush up on Canada's science projects and reflect on where the science stands now!
  • Mar 11, 2015
  • 196 words
  • 1 minutes
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Nostalgia often lends itself to times long since past. But focusing only on these halcyon days of yore can do a discredit to recent history. For example, the International Polar Year ran from 2007 to 2008. Even though less than a decade has passed since the results of many of these studies were presented, it’s still interesting to look back at Canadian Geographic’s interactive map of the various projects and reflect on what has changed in the time since.

After all, polar countries around the world agreed to make a concerted effort towards advancing scientific understanding of the Arctic and Antarctic. For Canada’s part, this manifested itself in research related to: atmosphere and weather, land and freshwater ecosystems, oceans and sea-ice, people and communities, and wildlife.

Learn where trace gases have been detected through Nunavut’s thinning polar sea ice cover, or where the Inuit health survey was conducted. Take advantage of our additional resources and helpful research descriptions. Or just enjoy clicking around and seeing where Canada’s northern research hubs are located.

Explore Canadian Geographic’s interactive map of the International Polar Year’s science projects in Canada here.

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