People & Culture

The simple agricultural kit improving life for Nepal’s terrace farmers

Life as a farmer on the terraced plots of land in Central Nepal isn’t easy, but the introduction of new agricultural practices and a few cheap, simple tools could be a boon for the men and women who work the region’s soil  
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • 73 words
  • 1 minutes
Photo: Dr. Tejendra Chapagain, University of Guelph Expand Image
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New agricultural practices and a few cheap, simple tools are making life much easier for those who work on Central Nepal’s terrace farms.  Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

Visit the Charting Change website to read “The simple agricultural kit improving life for Nepal’s terrace farmers.”

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