Environment

Meet five young scientists taking on major environmental issues

These finalists in the 57th annual Canada-Wide Science Fair prove the future is in good hands
  • May 17, 2018
  • 217 words
  • 1 minutes
More than 10,000 people visit the Canada-Wide Science Fair each year. Expand Image

Eager kids, proud parents and science fans filled the Fieldhouse at Ottawa’s Carleton University Wednesday to explore the projects created by some of Canada’s top young scientists as part of the annual Canada-Wide Science Fair.

Organized by the non-profit organization Youth Science Canada, the Canada-Wide Science Fair is a national competition that immerses youth 12 to 18 years old in all things science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This week, 450 regional and provincial finalists gathered in the nation’s capital to present some 400 projects on topics related to information technology, health, energy, the environment and more. Projects are judged by experts in each field, and the students compete for prizes and scholarships totalling nearly $1 million.

The goal of the competition is to inspire young people to engage with pressing issues happening in the world around them. Dominic Tremblay, a representative of Youth Science Canada, says the event is important because it gives students the opportunity to get invested in the sciences early on.

“We want to make sure that we have a future for science in Canada, and if students go through the process during their elementary or secondary school years, there’s a better chance that they will be in science programs in the future.”

Chong and Eckersley both wanted to create a project about forest fires after they witnessed how the catastrophe affected their community.
Chloe Williston found that childhood exposure to nature makes people more inclined to care about the environment in adulthood. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)
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White wanted to showcase information about climate change that would be relatable to the general public.
Chloe Williston found that childhood exposure to nature makes people more inclined to care about the environment in adulthood. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)
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Lauren Grace Ohnona: Ohnona says that the best part about the fair is getting to share her finding and presenting her project to the public.
Chloe Williston found that childhood exposure to nature makes people more inclined to care about the environment in adulthood. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)
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Nikki Van Schaik with her project on coral bleaching
Chloe Williston found that childhood exposure to nature makes people more inclined to care about the environment in adulthood. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)
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Chloe Williston with her project
Chloe Williston found that childhood exposure to nature makes people more inclined to care about the environment in adulthood. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)
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