Travel

Frost & Fire

Heating up for Wakefield’s chilly triathlon and run
  • Dec 31, 2013
  • 292 words
  • 2 minutes
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Wakefield, Quebec. With its picture-perfect rolling hills and woodlands, the area is a renowned destination for Ottawa’s weekend warriors, eager to escape the tedium of politics and bureaucrats via summertime canoeing and kayaking or skiing and snowmobiling in winter. The village also draws countless visitors to the pubs and galleries that have popped up to serve the artists and artisans who live in the area.

But Wakefield is much more than just a pretty face, and the second annual Frost & Fire Triathlon & Run on January 25 is happy proof of that. A fundraiser for Project North, a not-for-profit committed to enhancing and improving the lives of children in Canada’s North through education and fitness programs, Frost & Fire is a chance to put your passion into action.

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The triathlon portion features a 2.5 km snowshoe run, a 9.5 km cross-country ski (free technique) and a 5 km run. But single-minded runners also have an opportunity to participate in a 5 km or a 10 km run/walk. And new this year, a 2.5 km snowshoe run. The course promises some gruelling uphill climbs and occasional heavy traffic, but a post-race hot chocolate and a warm meal at the post-race awards ceremony will serve as a welcome restorative.

Last year’s competitors were such an exuberant bunch (even the Prime Minister’s wife turned up) that organizers Dayna Chicoine and Shelley Crabtree knew they’d struck gold. Count on this year’s sophomore effort to pack an even bigger punch as Aegle Events pursues it dream: promoting health and well-being and empowering through inspired giving. The kids in Canada’s North aren’t the only beneficiaries.

For more information, visit: www.frostandfire.ca

Photos: courtesy Frost & Fire

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