People & Culture

Fighting malaria in Northern Peru

Changing irrigation practices to combat malaria in Northern Peru
  • Nov 16, 2015
  • 75 words
  • 1 minutes
A member of the intermittent irrigation project team
A member of the intermittent irrigation project team (left) helps a local farmer conduct a test to measure rice yields near the town of Guadalupe in Northern Peru. (Photo: Esther Montalvan)
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When large-scale irrigation came to Peru’s northern coast in the 1960s and 1970s, it brought with it an explosion in agriculture — and one of the world’s deadliest diseases. Brian Owens examines how changing irrigation practices has helped turn the tide against malaria?. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world?, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

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