People & Culture

A creepy-crawly food revolution

Long considered pests, insects are now on the menu for farmed fish and poultry in Kenya and Uganda, where scientists are looking for cheaper, healthier ways to boost animal growth and develop the local economy
  • Mar 22, 2017
  • 68 words
  • 1 minutes
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In Kenya and Uganda, scientists are adding insects to fish and poultry feed to boost animal growth and develop the local economy. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.

Visit the Charting Change website to read “A creepy-crawly food revolution.”

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