About "Wildlife"

From polar bears to peregrine falcons, blue whales to bees, find out about Canada’s wildlife, habitats and conservation news.

Snow geese in flight

Dans les dernières décennies, le nombre d’oies des neiges qui se reproduisent dans l’Arctique a explosé. (Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club
Des experts inuits et des scientifiques d’Environnement Canada collaborent pour gérer une explosion démographique de l’oie des neiges
Thousands of snow geese in flight

Snow geese on their annual fall migration. In recent years, numbers of the birds arriving in the Arctic each spring to breed have skyrocketed, creating a conundrum for biologists. (Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club
Inuit experts and Environment Canada scientists are working together to manage an explosion in snow goose populations
One curious swift fox stares down the lens of an automatic wildlife camera near Medicine Hat, Alta. (Photo courtesy of the Nature Conservancy of Canada)

A curious swift fox stares down the lens of an automatic wildlife camera near Medicine Hat, Alta. (Photo courtesy Nature Conservancy of Canada)

Photo courtesy Nature Conservancy of Canada
A photo posted to Facebook by an amateur wildlife photographer led to the discovery of a new swift fox den in southern Alberta for the first time in nearly a century
Grizzly, wildlife, endangered species, Trump, protected

A grizzly in Banff National Park, Alberta. (Photo: Carlos Marrero Reiley/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Carlos Marrero Reiley/Can Geo Photo Club
Grizzlies, monarch butterflies and other keystone species could be at risk
Monarch butterflies cling to a fir tree in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve

Monarch butterflies cling to a fir tree in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in central Mexico. Discovering where the butterflies spent the winter months became a lifelong quest for a Canadian zoologist, Fred Urquhart, and his wife Norah — a mystery they solved in 1976. (Photo: Fiona McGlynn)

Photo: Fiona McGlynn
In 1976, my husband’s grandparents solved one of the world’s great natural mysteries: the monarch butterfly migration. Four decades later, we retraced their journey. 
Monarch butterfly on swamp milkweed

A monarch butterfly perched on swamp milkweed. Monarch caterpillars will only eat milkweed, so the plant is vital to the butterfly’s conservation. (Photo: Robert Rutkay/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Robert Rutkay/Can Geo Photo Club
International bio-blitz starting this weekend aims to crowdsource data on the monarch's habitat 
climate change landscapes across canada

The effects of climate change can already be observed across the country, and will only become more apparent as the planet continues to warm.

From floods to fires, drought to coastal erosion, climate change is already having an impact on Canada's communities, landscapes and wildlife
A  carpet  of  orange  zoanthids,  red  coralline  encrusting  algae  (shallow  enough  for  algae),  Stylaster  sp.hydrocorals, and  encrusting  demosponges.

A carpet of orange zoanthids, red coralline encrusting algae, Stylaster hydrocorals, and encrusting demosponges on the SGaan Kinghlas-Bowie seamount off the coast of Haida Gwaii, B.C. (Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Expedition team calls for permanent protection of undersea mountain range
Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon.

Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon. This image is part of a series, “Amazon: Paradise Threatened,” by American photographer Daniel Beltra exploring the destruction of the world’s largest tropical rainforest. Beltra placed third in the Environment - Stories category of the 2018 World Press Photo Contest. (Photo: Daniel Beltra)

Photo: Daniel Beltra
Tour of winning images to make four Canadian stops, starting July 20 at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
Little brown bat

Little brown bats in eastern Canada have been hit hard by white-nose syndrome and are now considered endangered. The disease is spreading west, leaving biologists scrambling for solutions. (Photo: Cori Lausen)

Photo: Cori Lausen
Disease has appeared for the first time in Manitoba, Minnesota and Wyoming 
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