About "RCGS"

The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is Canada’s Centre for Geography and Exploration, and one of the largest non-profit educational organizations in the nation.

Google Earth Voyager Jill Heinerth Story

Google Earth Voyager follows the career of underwater explorer Jill Heinerth, with each panel taking the reader to different expedition locations. (Photo: Google Earth Voyager)

Photo: Google Earth Voyager
Canadian Geographic celebrates the exploration and conservation work of RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Jill Heinerth in a new Google Earth Voyager story
Wildlife photographer Daisy Gilardini

Wildlife photographer Daisy Gilardini is Canadian Geographic's newest Photographer-in-Residence. (Photo: Ron Clifford)

Photo: Ron Clifford
Canadian Geographic's newest Photographer-in-Residence gives us a glimpse at her process
George Kourounis inside the Marum crater of Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu

George Kourounis stands beside a lava lake inside the Marum crater on Ambrym, a volcanic island in the Vanuatu archipelago, in 2014. To get to the lake, Kourounis and his film crew had to rappel down the side of the crater, which is deeper than the Empire State Building is tall. (Photo courtesy George Kourounis)

Photo courtesy George Kourounis
Whether outrunning a tornado, dodging lava bombs or hunkering down in a hurricane, explorer George Kourounis is most comfortable living on the edge
Coeur de pirate (Béatrice Martin) performs at the RCGS' Sights, Sounds and Tastes of Canada gala in Toronto

Cœur de pirate (Béatrice Martin) performs at the Sights, Sounds and Tastes of Canada gala in support of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society in Toronto on Feb. 28, where she was also presented with the Society's Bernier medal. (Photo: Tom Sandler/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Tom Sandler/Canadian Geographic
Quebec’s Béatrice Martin — better known by her stage name, Cœur de pirate — was recognized for her contributions to the Society and Canada's cultural landscape
Adam Shoalts, left, and George Kourounis were announced as Explorers-in-Residence of the RCGS on February 28

Adam Shoalts, left, and George Kourounis were announced as Explorers-in-Residence of the RCGS at a gala event in Toronto on February 28. (Photo: Tom Sandler/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Tom Sandler/Canadian Geographic
Expanded Explorer-in-Residence program to include storm chaser George Kourounis and solo explorer Adam Shoalts
Students from Katie Bartlett’s Grade 4 class at Topsail Elementary in Conception Bay South, N.L., check out Can Geo Education's new Giant Floor Map of their province at Manuels River Hibernia Interpretation Centre on March 2.

Students from Katie Bartlett’s Grade 4 class at Topsail Elementary in Conception Bay South, N.L., check out Can Geo Education's new Giant Floor Map of their province at Manuels River Hibernia Interpretation Centre on March 2. (Photo courtesy Manuels River)

Photo courtesy Manuels River
Crowdfunded by Fellows of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the new teaching tool is the first provincial map of its kind
Groundbreaking new educational resource coming this spring
University of Toronto, Meric Gertler, Fellow, RCGS

Meric Gertler has been president of the University of Toronto since 2013. (Photo: Lisa Sakulensky/University of Toronto)

Photo: Lisa Sakulensky/University of Toronto
The University of Toronto president is a world leader in urban theory and the geography of innovation, creativity and culture in city centres
RCGS Fellows

RCGS Fellows Russell Clark (pictured) and Trisha Stovel recently launched Beneath BC, an online project aimed at making underwater B.C., and eventually all of Canada, better known to Canadians. Read on to see what a few of the Society’s other Fellows are working on this year. (Photo: Russell Clark)

(Photo: Russel Clarke)
From documenting rock-hewn churches in Ethiopia to sonar-scanning B.C. waters for steam-era shipwrecks, see what just a few of the RCGS’s more than 1,000 Fellows are working on in 2018
"sump" in Bisaro Anima

A "sump" — an underground channel filled to the roof with water — discovered in the Bisaro Anima cave during a previous expedition in October 2017. On January 1, 2018, caver Kathleen Graham was able to explore the sump in scuba gear and confirm Bisaro Anima as the deepest cave in Canada. (Photo: Jared Habiak/Bisaro Plateau Caves Project)

Photo: Jared Habiak/Bisaro Plateau Caves Project
At 670 metres, Bisaro Anima near Fernie, B.C. is confirmed to be Canada's deepest cave
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