About "People & Culture"

The people and ideas shaping the way we think about our natural and human-made spaces, design, art and photography and more in Canada

teachers caring for students sick with the Spanish Flu

Des enseignantes s’occupent d’enfants malades de la grippe espagnole au collège La Salle de Thetford Mines, au Québec. (Photo : Centre d’archives de la région de Thetford - Fonds Galerie de nos ancêtres de l’or blanc, Donateur : Juliette Dallaire)

Photo : Centre d’archives de la région de Thetford - Fonds Galerie de nos ancêtres de l’or blanc (Donateur: Juliette Dallaire)
L’histoire méconnue de la grippe espagnole de 1918 et notre état de préparation à la prochaine grande pandémie
A female pronghorn with her twins on the Canadian prairie. The species is hailed as a conservation success story, but its future is uncertain. (Photo: Sandra Forbes)

A female pronghorn with her twins on the Canadian prairie. The species is hailed as a conservation success story, but its future is uncertain. (Photo: Sandra Forbes)

Photo: Sandra Forbes
The story of a biologist’s lifelong study of an endangered species — and its future

Sunlight breaks through dark clouds to cast a glow over the Tombstone River Valley near the Talus Lake backcountry campground in Yukon’s Tombstone Territorial Park. (Photo: Victor Liu)

Photo: Victor Liu
A look back at the most awe-inspiring and thought-provoking visuals we published this year

A selection of the best books of 2018, as chosen by Canadian Geographic’s editors.

Memoirs, a graphic novel and the biography of a famous ship are among Canadian Geographic's choices for the 14 best books of the year
RCGS, Fellows, explore, Arctic, environment, mapping

Gordon Osinski, a planetary geologist at Western University in London, Ont., led a 2018 expedition to map parts of Devon Island’s exposed Precambrian Shield — Arctic coastlines that have never been surveyed by on-the-ground teams. (Photo: Gordon Osinski)

Photo: Gordon Osinski
From a solo ski and mountain-climbing expedition to the South Pole to a project that mapped portions of Devon Island’s coasts for the first time, see what just a few of the RCGS’s Fellows have been working on in late 2018
Josiah Henson, log cabin, Ontario, historic site

The Henson House has been moved many times since Josiah Henson’s death in 1883, but its current location by the Sydenham River on Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site is similar to its original setting. (Photo: Heather Greenwood Davis)

Photo: Heather Greenwood Davis
Heather Greenwood Davis visits Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site in Dresden, Ont., to learn more about the contentious inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Arctic Indigenous Wellness Project, indigenous, suicide prevention, homelessness, therapy, education

Members of the Arctic Indigenous Wellness Project, winners of the $1-million 2017 Arctic Inspiration Prize. (Photo: Arctic Inspiration Prize/Patrick Doyle)

Photo: Arctic Inspiration Prize/Patrick Doyle
A look back at some of the amazing projects that have won the $1-million Arctic Inspiration Prize
St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and t

St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and two Canadians. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith
Roaming First World War sites and cemeteries in northern France and Belgium, Stephen Smith reflects on what time heals — and what it can’t 
Minister Wilkinson

Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announces a $1 million investment in environmental response equipment in Victoria in September 2018. (Photo: Office of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans)

Photo: Office of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans
The new Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard sits down with Canadian Geographic for an exclusive interview on a range of topics, from salmon to whales to ‘last ice’
Lady Franklin, Sir John Franklin, London, Arctic, explorer, Erebus, Terror

Erika Behrisch Elce’s new book develops the character of the famously private Lady Franklin through imagined letters to her explorer husband, written around the time of his untimely Arctic death. (Images, clockwise from left: Stonehouse Publishing; Amelie Romilly, 1815/public domain; National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London)

Images, clockwise from left: Stonehouse Publishing; Amelie Romilly, 1815/public domain; National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London
A new novel by Erika Behrisch Elce brings Lady Franklin — widow of doomed polar explorer Sir John Franklin — to life in new and creative ways
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