About "The North"

The people, places, events and latest research of Canada’s subarctic and Arctic regions, one of the fastest-changing environments on Earth

Steven Jackson heading to Inuvik on day five of the 6633 Arctic Ultra, a gruelling 617-kilometre footrace from the Yukon to the Northwest Territories. (Photo courtesy 6633 Arctic Ultra)

Photo courtesy 6633 Arctic Ultra
Ottawa-area marathoner Steven Jackson is one of only 39 people to ever finish the 6633 Arctic Ultra 
Iqaluit

The City of Iqaluit has asked anyone with plans to visit the north to delay their travel in a bid to prevent COVID-19 from spreading to the city and other communities across Nunavut. (Photo: Fiona Paton/Flickr)

Photo: Fiona Paton/Flickr
Indigenous and Inuit communities are expressing concern as the threat of COVID-19 comes nearer to their communities
A polar bear walks on the Arctic tundra

A polar bear crosses the tundra in the Churchill Wildlife Management Area, Man. (Photo: Andrew Lovesey/Can Geo)

Photo: Andrew Lovesey/Can Geo
Winter apparel brand Canada Goose has partnered with Polar Bears International to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change on the north’s most iconic animal
Charles Camsell Christmas

A photo from the Liard River Canyon during the expedition that inspired Royal Canadian Geographical Society founder Charles Camsell (second from left) to write a Christmas story that has since been shared with his family for generations. (Photo courtesy of David McGuffin)

(Photo courtesy of David McGuffin)
Nearly 100 years ago, Royal Canadian Geographical Society founder Charles Camsell wrote a Christmas story that has been shared through his family for generations. In honour of the Society’s 90th anniversary, his family shared it with Canadian Geographic to be published for the first time. 
Wayne Pollard Lost Hammer Spring

Wayne Pollard, winner of the 2019 Weston Family Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Northern Research, poses by the Lost Hammer Spring on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, one of a number of places he discovered in the High Arctic where water flows year-round. (Photo courtesy Wayne Pollard)

Photo courtesy Wayne Pollard
Research scientist Wayne Pollard shares insights on his work that earned him the 2019 Weston Family Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Northern Research
Best Canadian Geographic maps 2019
Cartographic highlights from Canadian Geographic’s 2019 issues
Fishing boat on the shore of Spitsbergen, Svalbard

Relics from past eras, such as this fishing boat on the shore of Spitsbergen, are common reminders of Svalbard's long history. (Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Tanya Kirnishni
From coal mining to scientific research, the remote archipelago of Svalbard has a rich and complex heritage
ice chunks near glacier

Ice breaking off at the Burgerbukta Glacier, which extends out into the Hornsund fiord in southern Svalbard. (Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Can Geo)

Photo: Tanya Kirnishni/Can Geo
A warmer, wetter, and wilder climate is unbalancing the Arctic ecosystem
Researchers from the international PoLAR-FIT team are revealing a four-million-year-old forest beautifully preserved in permafrost and peat on Nunavut’s Ellesmere Island

The main expedition campsite of the PoLAR-FIT research team, just southwest of the Fyles Leaf Beds fossil site on Ellesmere Island. (Photo: Alexandra Rouillard)

Photo: Alexandra Rouillard
Researchers from the international PoLAR-FIT team are revealing a four-million-year-old forest beautifully preserved in permafrost and peat on Nunavut’s Ellesmere Island
Shamans, Spirits, and Faith in the Inuit North

Kenn Harper’s new book (left) details traditional Inuit mythology such as the central story of Sedna (right) and how those beliefs came to interact with Christianity, which missionaries began introducing into the Arctic in the 19th century. (Left: Courtesy of Inhabit Media; right: Germaine Arnaktauyok: Sedna — The Ruler, 1994/courtesy of Inhabit Media)

Left: Courtesy of Inhabit Media; right: Germaine Arnaktauyok: Sedna — The Ruler, 1994/courtesy of Inhabit Media
In this exclusive excerpt from Kenn Harper’s new book, the Arctic historian explores tales of Inuit and Christian beliefs and how these came to coexist — and sometimes clash — in the 19th and 20th centuries
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