About "The North"

The people, places, events and latest research of Canada’s subarctic and Arctic regions, one of the fastest-changing environments on Earth

a collage of images of Nunavut, including an Inuit child, Aaju Peter, a polar bear, the community of Pond Inlet, Lamech Kadloo, the community of Kugluktuk, ice

Clockwise from bottom left: A common murre takes flight in the Northwest Passage; ice in the Northwest Passage; a young boy in Cape Dorset; the community of Pond Inlet, on northern Baffin Island; Lamech Kadloo gives a traditional drum performance in Pond Inlet; the road to Kugluktuk; Aaju Peter in Iqaluit; a polar bear on Sentry Island, west of Arviat. (Photos: Michelle Valberg)

Photos: Michelle Valberg
Reflecting on 20 years of Canada's newest territory, Nunavut
Floe edge polar bear, Nunavut

A polar bear on the sea ice close to the floe edge at Button Point, on the southeast corner of Bylot Island, Nunavut. (Photo: Françoise Gervais/Arctic Kingdom)

Photo: Françoise Gervais/Arctic Kingdom
Welcome to the sinaaq, or floe edge, where landfast ice meets open Arctic Ocean and species thrive
A person in a space suit and helmet stands in front of a rocky, dry landscape on Devon Island

Devon Island in the Canadian High Arctic is the largest uninhabited island on Earth and the most Mars-like environment on our planet, which is why NASA has chosen it as a base for its research and planning for a future mission to the red planet.
(Photo: Google)

Photo courtesy Google
A new Google project zeroes in on Canada’s Devon Island, the most Mars-like environment on Earth
Arctic Frontiers conference 2019

Aili Keskitalo, the president of the Sami Parliament of Norway, speaks at the "State of the Arctic" session at the Arctic Frontiers conference in Tromsø, Norway. (Photo: Terje Mortensen/Arctic Frontiers 2019)

Arctic Frontiers conference 2019
The uncertainty and change that's currently disrupting the region dominated the annual meeting's agenda
How we chose the cover, polar bear, walrus, seal, floe edge, arctic, north

Cover options for the May/June issue of Canadian Geographic.

Thanks to everyone who voted!
PEARL, North, Arctic, wildfire, spectrometer

The rooftop dome of the PEARL Ridge Lab spectrometer. The dome houses the solar-tracker, which guides light into the input window through a hole in the roof. (Photo: Erik Lutsch)

Photo: Erik Lutsch
Atmospheric readings in Canada’s High Arctic are helping scientists understand how southern wildfires are affecting air quality and climate
PEARL, North, Arctic, wildfire, spectrometer

Le dôme du spectromètre sur la toiture du Laboratoire Ridge de PEARL. Le dôme abrite le suiveur solaire, qui oriente la lumière à l’intérieur de la fenêtre d’entrée à travers un trou dans la toiture. (Photo : Erik Lutsch)

Photo : Erik Lutsch
Les relevés atmosphériques dans l’Extrême-Arctique canadien aident les scientifiques à comprendre comment les feux de forêt au sud influent sur la qualité de l’air et le climat
CHARS, Canadian High Arctic Research Station, laboratories, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, North

The new Canadian High Arctic Research Station’s laboratories are now being phased into operation. (Photo: Janice Lang/DRDC-DND)

Photo: Janice Lang/DRDC-DND
What does it take to operate high-tech scientific facilities — including live-study growing chambers and necropsy, genomics and imaging labs — in Canada’s Arctic?
CHARS, Canadian High Arctic Research Station, laboratories, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, North

Les laboratoires de la nouvelle Station canadienne de recherche dans l’Extrême-Arctique sont en voie de mise en exploitation. (Photo : Janice Lang/RDDC-DND)

Photo : Janice Lang/DRDC-DND
Quels sont les éléments nécessaires pour exploiter les installations scientifiques de pointe, entre autres les chambres d’étude et d’autopsie, la génomique et les laboratoires d’imagerie, dans l’Arctique canadien? 
Members of the Pirurvik project accepting their award

Representatives from the Pirurvik - A Place to Grow project accept their $1-million prize at the award ceremony in Whitehorse on Feb. 12. (Photo: Arctic Inspiration Prize)

Photo: Arctic Inspiration Prize
A total of $2,566,000 was awarded to five Northern Indigenous programs at a ceremony in Whitehorse Feb. 12
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