About "National & Provincial Parks"

Canada’s network of national and provincial parks, marine conservation areas and historic sites protects the country’s most treasured natural and cultural spaces.

Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve

Over a third of the water around Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site may soon be fully protected from commercial activity under the terms of a new 10-year management plan for the region. (Photo: Iain Reid/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Iain Reid/Can Geo Photo Club
Lengthy education campaign achieved compromise between fishing industry, environmental advocates
The marsh boardwalk through Point Pelee National Park at sunset

Point Pelee National Park is a birder’s dream, a paddler’s paradise, and the perfect place to get up close and personal with nature. (Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic
Established in 1918, Canada’s southernmost national park is a haven for wildlife and nature lovers alike
Shining Falls in the boreal forest

Pimachiowin Aki has been recognized by UNESCO for both its natural and cultural significance. (Photo: Pimachiowin Aki Corporation)

Photo: Pimachiowin Aki Corporation
The 29,040-square-kilometre swath of boreal forest on the Manitoba-Ontario border is the first World Heritage Site in Canada to be recognized for both its cultural and natural significance
Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic
Canadian Geographic will collaborate with McKenna on exclusive content for the November/December 2018 issue 
Help Canadian Geographic and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada make 2018 an unforgettable year for Canadian tourism
Boreal forest landscape near Fort McMurray, Alta.

More than 67,000 square kilometres of boreal forest is now protected thanks to a partnership between conservation groups, government and First Nations. (Photo: Michel Rapinski)

Photo: Michel Rapinski
The newly created Birch River Wildland Park joins a network of parks preserving an area of boreal wilderness twice the size of Vancouver Island
Parks Canada red Muskoka chairs on a snowy slope overlooking the Banff townsite

Red Muskoka chairs placed by Parks Canada to encourage reflection wait for visitors at the Mount Norquay viewpoint above Banff townsite in Banff National Park. In a new report, Parks Canada has pledged to put nature first in decisions affecting national parks. (Photo: Kevin Mihalcheon/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Kevin Mihalcheon/Can Geo Photo Club
Responding to feedback from Canadians, environment minister Catherine McKenna promised a renewed focus on science and conservation for Canada's protected places
Kenzie Wakefield begins the rugged trail to Mt. St. Patrick, the highest peak in the park, as part of her first week of training and getting to know the lay of the land.

Kenzie Wakefield begins the rugged trail to Mt. St. Patrick, the highest peak in Cape Scott Provincial Park, as part of her first week of training, which involves getting to know the lay of the land. (Photo: Matt Law/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Matt Law/Canadian Geographic
This is not your average summer job
Christian Bagg, trail, invention, wheelchair, Great Trail

Icon Wheelchairs founder Christian Bagg has tested many versions of his powerful Explore model on The Great Trail’s West Bragg Creek routes, in Alberta.

Photo: Christian Bagg
Christian Bagg, founder of Icon Wheelchairs, is a true trailblazer
Robson Bight Day to Night

This image of B.C.'s Robson Bight was created as part of renowned photographer Stephen Wilkes' Day to Night series by combining hundreds of images taken during a 26-hour period in August 2016. (Photo: Stephen Wilkes)

Photo: Stephen Wilkes
For the latest image in his iconic Day to Night series, photographer Stephen Wilkes set his sights on an important ecological reserve in British Columbia. Here's why. 
Subscribe to National & Provincial Parks