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From Canada’s early First Nations and Inuit cultures to European exploration, Confederation, women’s suffrage, wartime and beyond.

Thou Shalt do no Murder, Minik, The New York Eskimo, Kenn Harper

Cover images for author Kenn Harper's two new books, Thou Shalt Do No Murder (left) and Minik: The New York Eskimo. (Images courtesy Nunavut Arctic College Media, Steerforth Press)

Images courtesy Nunavut Arctic College Media, Steerforth Press
In his new book, Thou Shalt Do No Murder, historian Kenn Harper explores how the killing of a trader in 1920 set off a clash of cultures in the Canadian High Arctic that still resonates today
Ry Moran at 50 Sussex Drive

Ry Moran, director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, speaks at the launch of the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada project at 50 Sussex Drive in Ottawa June 9. (Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic
The director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation reflects on Indigenous progress in 2017 and looks ahead to 2067

(Map: University of Alberta Archives, 1995-166, Soper, J. Dewey Small Accessions)

University of Alberta Archives, 1995-166, Soper, J. Dewey Small Accessions
In 1929, J. Dewey Soper’s quest to find the breeding grounds of the blue goose ended, thanks in part to this marvelously detailed hand-drawn map
Tilley Paddler's Hat, niagara falls, waterproof, ontario

Canadian Geographic editor-in-chief Aaron Kylie (with family) put the Tilley Paddler's Hat to the test against Niagara's fury, among other locations this past summer. (Photo: Genevieve Taylor/Canadian Geographic) 

Photo: Genevieve Taylor/Canadian Geographic
From Niagara's fury to suburban soccer pitches, the iconic Tilley Hat keeps you cool, dry and shaded from the sun
Environment and Climate Change minister Catherine McKenna

Environment and Climate Change minister Catherine McKenna talks with Parks Canada scientist Darroch Whitaker near Labrador's Torngat Mountains Base Camp and Research station in early August 2017. (Photo: Environment and Climate Change Canada.)

Environment and Climate Change minister Catherine McKenna
The Environment and Climate Change minister shares insights from her recent tour of Labrador's Nunatsiavut region and Torngat Mountains National Park

David Lamb stands in a workshop where he carves stone destined for the Parliament Buildings. (Photo: Peter Andrew Lusztyk/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Peter Andrew Lusztyk/Canadian Geographic

(Map: Paulus de Furlanis veronensis opus hoc ex. mi cosmographi d[omi]ni iacobi gastaldi pedemontani instauravit, et dicavit ex. ti iur. vt doct[iss] et aurato aequiti d[omi]no paulo michaeli vincentino, Paulo Forlani, 1560, Library and Archives Canada, E006581135)

Map: Library and Archives Canada, E006581135
Chet Van Duzer, a cartographic historian and the author of Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps analyses Paolo Forlani's 1560 world map – the first known instance of the name "Canada" appearing on a printed map
A solemn group of women and children look on at the scene of an artillery train wreck, the debris pushed out in front of them. A lone officer sits with his legs crossed, his gaze directed towards the viewer

The wreck of the artillery train at Enterprise, Ontario, June 9, 1903. (Photo: Harriett Amelia May, courtesy of the British Library)

Photo: Harriett Amelia May, courtesy of the British Library
A new exhibit at the British Library in London, U.K. features images captured by Canadians between 1895 and 1924
Canada Embassy of Norway Royal Canadian Geographical Society Roald Amundsen

Left: Cloth-bound editions of a new English translation of Roald Amundsen’s Northwest Passage diary on display at a celebration co-hosted by the Embassy of Norway and The Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Right: Norway’s Ambassador to Canada Anne Kari Ovind with RCGS CEO John Geiger. (Photos: Nick Walker/Lindsay Ralph/Canadian Geographic)

Photos: Nick Walker/Lindsay Ralph/Canadian Geographic
The Embassy of Norway has gifted Canada with the first English translation of Roald Amundsen’s Northwest Passage diaries, reaffirming a shared polar past and future 
Close up image of the Sam Greer's hand drawn letter and land claim. The claim would have included all of what is now Kits Beach and Kits Point (not Vanier Park).

A scan of the 1884 land claim of Sam Greer, which recently sold for $24,000 at auction. (Image courtesy All Nations Stamp and Coin)

Image courtesy All Nations Stamp and Coin
Brian Grant Duff from All Nations Stamp and Coin explains the controversial land claim made by Irish settler Sam Greer on what is today known as Kits Beach
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