About "Environment & Nature"

News about climate change and other environmental issues and the people and organizations behind the science.

Three painted turtles sunning on a log

Groups of sunning painted turtles are a common sight around lakes and rivers in southern Ontario, but the species faces an uncertain future, according to biologists. (Photo: Alyx Luger/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Alyx Luger/Can Geo Photo Club
To save turtles, we need to think in “turtle time,” biologist says
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr), CC BY-SA

Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (Photo: NOAA Photo Library/flickr, CC BY-SA)

Photo: NOAA Photo Library/flickr, CC BY-SA
The death and entanglement of 17 of the endangered mammals last summer spurred an unprecedented effort to make the Gulf of St. Lawrence safer — but will it be enough? 
infographic of findings from BioBlitz Canada 150

An infographic showing a few key findings from BioBlitz Canada 150. (Infographic: Canadian Wildlife Federation)

Infographic: Canadian Wildlife Federation
35 events, 16,600 hours and 7,510 recorded species: the results are in from a series of bioblitz events held to commemorate Canada 150
Glass sponge reef in B.C.'s Hecate Strait

A glass sponge reef in B.C.'s Hecate Strait. Researchers have found that these mysterious, ancient animals evolved defensive behaviours to protect themselves from suffocation by excess sediment. (Photo: Sally Leys/CSSF/DFO)

Photo: Sally Leys/CSSF/DFO
New research reveals these unique animals evolved a way to rid their systems of excess sediment — but the sponges may be having trouble keeping up with human activity in their habitat
More than 10,000 people visit the Canada-Wide Science Fair each year.

More than 10,000 people visit the Canada-Wide Science Fair each year. This year, 450 young finalists from across Canada presented more than 400 projects on topics related to information technology, health, energy, the environment and more. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic
These finalists in the 57th annual Canada-Wide Science Fair prove the future is in good hands
Common Eastern Bumblebee male foraging from Woodland Sunflower. Photo by Sheila Colla)

A common eastern bumblebee male foraging from a woodland sunflower. (Photo: Sheila Colla)

Photo: Sheila Colla
To save the bees, we first need to understand them—and recognize their value independent of their role as pollinators
Lady Slipper Orchids by Ann Love, one of 48 works of botanical art on display now at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. Lady slipper orchids are a native perennial wildflower found across Canada.

Lady Slipper Orchids by Ann Love, one of 48 works of botanical art on display now at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. Lady slipper orchids are a native perennial wildflower found across Canada. (Image courtesy the artist, Canadian Museum of Nature)

Illustration: Ann Love, courtesy Canadian Museum of Nature
Art of the Plant, on now through October at the Canadian Museum of Nature, is Canada's contribution to a worldwide project showcasing botanical biodiversity
Boreal forest landscape near Fort McMurray, Alta.

More than 67,000 square kilometres of boreal forest is now protected thanks to a partnership between conservation groups, government and First Nations. (Photo: Michel Rapinski)

Photo: Michel Rapinski
The newly created Birch River Wildland Park joins a network of parks preserving an area of boreal wilderness twice the size of Vancouver Island
Left: Adam Weymouth author photo. Right: Book cover Kings of the Yukon

Adam Weymouth's first book, Kings of the Yukon, sees him paddle the length of the Yukon River to trace the route of migrating chinook salmon, a fish that has long been the lifeblood of the economy and culture of those who live along the waterway. (Author photo: Suki Dhanda)

Author photo: Suki Dhanda
Adam Weymouth's first book, Kings of the Yukon, sees him paddle the length of the Yukon River to trace the route of migrating chinook salmon
A savannah sparrow

A new study has found that savannah sparrows near noisy sites are having a hard time communicating, in part due to stress. (Photo: Paulson Des Brisay)

Photo: Paulson Des Brisay
Study finds birds near noisy sites are stressed out and struggling to adapt
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