• Small chunks of ice remain on the shore of Cambridge Bay

    Small chunks of ice remain on the shore of Cambridge Bay. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Dr. Martin Raillard

    Dr. Martin Raillard, Chief Scientist at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, examines a plant after collecting a muskox scat sample. Dr. Raillard has spent much of his career working in the Canadian Arctic and lived and raised his family in Arctic for 12 years. Anguti, which means 'man' in the Inuit language, accompanied Dr. Raillard on a two-week hike into the remote Elu Inlet research station and is never far from his side. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • 12 o'clock daily check-ins from a sat phone

    12 o'clock daily check-ins from a sat phone. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • A mated pair of sandhill cranes

    A mated pair of sandhill cranes engaged in 'unison calling', a synchronized and complex duet where the female makes two calls for every one from the male. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Cambridge Bay will be home to the CHARS facility

    Cambridge Bay will be home to the CHARS facility, which is still being built, but research will also be done in places such as Elu Inlet (pictured), about 70 kilometres south of Cambridge Bay. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Eric Hoberg, a Senior Researcher at the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture, is swarmed by mosquitos while doing fieldwork at Elu Inlet, near Cambridge Bay.

    Eric Hoberg, a Senior Researcher at the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture, is swarmed by mosquitos while doing fieldwork at Elu Inlet, near Cambridge Bay. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Eric Hoberg, a Senior Researcher at the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture, exits a float plane in Cambridge Bay

    Eric Hoberg, a Senior Researcher at the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture, exits a float plane in Cambridge Bay after returning from four days of fieldwork, holding lemmings and ground squirrels that he and his colleagues collected and stuffed at the Elu Inlet research station. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • The voles, lemmings and ground squirrels that she and her colleagues collected and stuffed at the Elu Inlet research station

    Voles, lemmings and ground squirrels that were collected and stuffed at the Elu Inlet research station. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • The tundra is covered with plant life in the summer

    The tundra is covered with plant life in the summer, such as this prickly saxifrage. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Children from Cambidge Bay participate in a Science Camp led by Polar Knowledge Canada

    Children from Cambidge Bay participate in a Science Camp led by Polar Knowledge Canada. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

  • Angulalik Pedersen, a Technical Assistant at Polar Knowledge Canada, pulls an Arctic char from a gillnet in Cambridge Bay

    Angulalik Pedersen, a Technical Assistant at Polar Knowledge Canada, pulls an Arctic char from a gillnet in Cambridge Bay. (Photo: Paul Colangelo)

With photography by

The Canadian High Arctic Research Station is set to open in the summer of 2017. To assess the progress, and talk with those who are helping to bring the ambitious project together, photographer Paul Colangelo travelled north to Cambridge Bay with writer Alex Hutchinson.

While there, they met with Dr. Martin Raillard, chief scientist at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. Dr. Raillard has spent much of his career working in the Canadian Arctic and lived and raised his family in Arctic for 12 years.

They also met Angulalik Pedersen, a technical assistant at Polar Canada, and Eric Hoberg, a senior researcher at the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture, both of whom Colangelo captured in the photos above.

Read more about their journey in the June issue of Canadian Geographic.