A.Y. Jackson was one. So was Frederick Varley.

Though most know them as members of the Group of Seven, Jackson and Varley were first soldiers who used their talents to record the First World War through their art. They, and many other soldiers, were deeply affected by the war, which continued to shape their work even after the Armistice.

Scroll down for some examples of the glorious and ghastly creations from Canadian soldiers that developed from the war.

A line of soldiers trek through a muddy, barren landscape. (Credit: A.Y. Jackson, A Copse, Evening, 1918, Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, 19710261-0186.)

Portrait of Sergeant Tommy Holmes, painted by Ernest Fosbery, one of Canada’s first official war artists. (Credit: Ernest Fosbery, Sergeant T. W. Holmes, V.C. around 1918 © Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario 19710261-0148.)

Future Group of Seven painter Frederick Varley shows the horrors of war and what conflict was really like. While there’s a rainbow symbolizing hope in the background, dead German soldiers litter the foreground. (Credit: Frederick Varley, The Sunken Road, 1919 © Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario 19710261-0771.)

Future Group of Seven painter Arthur Lismer depicts the arrival of the Olympic in Halifax Harbour on Dec. 14, 1918. (Credit: © Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario 19710261-0343.)

Canadian Gyrth Russell’s painting of a destroyed building and injured soldier highlights the devastation of war. (Credit: Gyrth Russell, White Chateau, Liévin, 1918 © Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario 19710261-0622.)

Soldier-artist Douglas Culham’s painting shows men and horses transporting ammunition needed for guns during the Battle of Passchendaele in Belgium. (Credit: Douglas Culham, Mud Road to Passchendaele, around 1917 © Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario 19890222-001.)

Painter Homer Watson shows recruits of the First Contingent practicing on the firing range at Valcartier, Que., 1914. (Credit: Homer Watson, Camp at Sunrise, 1915, Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, 19710261-0810.)

War artist William Thurston Topham depicts his “home” on the Somme, which was later destroyed by shell fire. (Credit: William Thurston Topham, An Artist's Home on the Somme, 1916, Beaverbrook Collection of War Art, 19710261-0732.)